Version: v0.1.0-alpha.5

Wordpress

Wordpress with Kubernetes

While hosting a blog on Kubernetes might be somewhat of an overkill, it can make for a good learning experience. In this tutorial, let's deploy Wordpress with Kalm in 5 minutes.

Create New Application

The first thing we need is a new Application for the two components that make up our WordPress site.

  • In your Kalm application dashbord, click Create App and enter your application's name

We used the name another-blog for this tutorial.

Create new application

Add The Database Component

Once you create the application, you'll be prompted to add a component to it. We'll start by adding our Database Component.

  • For the component Name, enter wordpress-mysql
  • For the component Image, enter mysql:5.6

Configurations

Next we'll move into the Config tab.

  • Under Environment Variables, click + New Variable
    • For the Name, enter MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD
    • For the Value, enter mysql-pass

Add Database Component 1

Networking

Now we'll expose a Container Port to the cluster so we can access this image. Click the Networking tab.

  • Under Ports, click + ADD
    • For the Protocol, keep the default http
    • For the Container Port, enter 3306
    • You can keep the Service Port blank

Add Database Component 2

Disks

Lastly, we'll add some storage for this image. Click on the Disks tab.

  • Under Disks, click + Add
    • For the Type, keep the default Create and mount disk
    • For the Mount Path, enter /var/lib/mysql
    • For the Storage Class, keep the default kalm-hdd
    • For the Size, enter 1Gi

Add Database Component 3

Click Deploy Component and our pod will start spinning up. While this is deploying, we'll setup our second component.

Add The Wordpress Component

To add our second component, we'll click Add Component from the Application Components page.

  • For the component Name, enter wordpress
  • For the component Image, also enter wordpress

Configurations

Once again we'll move to the Config tab. This time we're adding two Environment Variables.

  • Under Environment Variables, click + New Variable
    • For the Name, enter MYSQL_ROOT_HOST
    • For the Value, enter wordpress-mysql
  • Click + New Variable again to add a second Environment Variable
    • For the Name, enter MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD
    • For the Value, enter mysql-pass

Add Database Component 3

Networking

Once again we'll click the Networking tab and expose a container port to the cluster.

  • Under Ports click + ADD
    • For the Protocol, keep the default http
    • For the Container Port, enter 80
    • You can keep the Service Port blank again

Add Database Component 2

Disks

Again we'll click the Disks tab to add storage for this component.

  • Under Disks, click + Add
    • For the Type, keep the default Create and mount disk
    • For the Mount Path, enter /var/www/html
    • For the Storage Class, keep the default kalm-hdd
    • For the Size, enter 1Gi

Add Database Component 3

Add Route

Lastly, we need to open a Route for our WordPress component so we can access it via a web browser. Click the Routes tab on the left navigation menu.

  • Click Add Route
    • For Hosts, you can either use your own domain or just click the ingress ip quick action (the cluster IP under the Hosts input field)
    • For Targets, click the Choose a target dropdown and select your wordpress:80 component from the menu.
    • You can leave all of the other options as their defaults
    • Click Create Route to create your route

Add Database Component 3

Rock it!

After a few seconds, all of the components should be up and running and there should be a green checkmark next to your new route.

Add Database Component 3

You can click the domain to open up and play with your new WordPress site!

Add Database Component 3

Last updated on by david